Category Archives: Just for Fun

The unexplained, interesting Apps, aliens and more

Wonders of the World – Honorable mentions

In the prior series of posts, I submitted my favorites. Here are a few others that deserve recognition:

The Serapeum of Saqqara: 24 giant sarcophagi, each weighing 100 tons! See details at:

https://www.ancient-origins.net/unexplained-phenomena/serapeum-sarcophagi-021992

One of the Serapeum sarcophagi in Saqqara, Egypt. (Ovedc/CC BY SA 4.0)

Derinkuyu: A massive ancient underground city that housed up to 20,000 residents. See details at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Derinkuyu_underground_city

Petra Jordan: Inhabited as early as 7,000 BC.

See details at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petra

The Antikythera mechanism: The Antikythera mechanism is an ancient Greek hand-powered analog computer which has also been described as the first example of such a device used to predict astronomical positions and eclipses for calendar and astrological purposes decades in advance. It is estimated to have been built in the late second century BC[5] or the early first century BC. See details at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antikythera_mechanism

NAMA Machine d'Anticythère 1.jpg

The Basílica de la Sagrada Família 

On 19 March 1882, construction of the Sagrada Família began under architect Francisco de Paula del Villar. In 1883, when Villar resigned, Gaudí took over as chief architect, transforming the project with his architectural and engineering style, combining Gothic and curvilinear Art Nouveau forms. Gaudí devoted the remainder of his life to the project, and he is buried in the crypt. At the time of his death in 1926, less than a quarter of the project was complete. The project is projected to be completed in 2032, 150 years after it commenced. For more details see at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sagrada_Fam%C3%ADlia

The Burj Khalifa 

The Burj Khalifa known as the Burj Dubai prior to its inauguration in 2010, is a skyscraper in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. With a total height of 829.8 m (2,722 ft)See more details at: https://www.burjkhalifa.ae/en/the-tower/facts-figures

The Chunnel

The Chunnel, is a 50.45-kilometre (31.35 mi) railway tunnel that connects Folkestone (KentEnglandUK) with Coquelles (Hauts-de-FranceFrance) beneath the English Channel at the Strait of Dover. It is the only fixed link between the island of Great Britain and the European mainland. At its lowest point, it is 75 m (250 ft) deep below the sea bed and 115 m (380 ft) below sea level. At 37.9 kilometres (23.5 mi), the tunnel has the longest underwater section of any tunnel in the world. The speed limit for trains through the tunnel is 160 km/h (100 mph). For more details see at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Channel_Tunnel

The Coral Castle

Created by just one man working alone for 28 years until his death in 1951. He was a Latvian immigrant named Edward Leedskalnin who stood, it is said, 5 feet tall (1.5 meters) and weighed 100 lbs. (45 kilograms). Legend has it that he was inspired to build the structure after being abandoned by his 16-year-old sweetheart on what was to be their wedding day. Spurned by his lost love, he set out to prove to her — and the world — that he could do something remarkable, and make something of himself despite his poverty and fourth-grade education. And he succeeded spectacularly. For more details see at: https://www.livescience.com/41075-coral-castle.html

My Eight Wonders of the World (con’t) Kailasa Temple

 

Kailasa Temple in Ellora, Maharashtra, India, is the world’s largest monolithic piece of art. Master craftspeople carved the gigantic structure from a single piece of solid rock in a cave on a mountainside. The entire building took more than two decades to carve. There are plenty of other mind-boggling facts about this ancient wonder while some of the history behind the temple has a bit of controversy attached to it.

Architects started from the top of the mountain and worked downward to carve the structure. The painstaking process removed more than 2,000,000 tons of volcanic rock between 757 and 783 A.D., according to archaeologists. Kailasa Temple is one of 34 caves in the area carved from solid rock. Other similar caves date back as early as 300 B.C.

Kailasa Temple covers more square footage than the Parthenon in Athens. Somehow, civilizations in India came and went without anyone noticing this magnificent art until 1682.

That’s when Mughal King Aurangzeb, a Muslim, ordered the temple destroyed so he could erase all traces of it. Despite three years and 1,000 men, Kailasa Temple endured. The rock was simply too hard to demolish, even though artisans used only hammers, chisels and picks to construct it.

           See details at: https://metrosaga.com/mysterious-facts-about-kailash-temple/

Eight Wonders of the World (con’t) Lalibela

Lalibela is a town in Ethiopia famous for its rock-cut monolithic churches. The whole of Lalibela is a large antiquity of the medieval and post-medieval civilization of Ethiopia. To Christians, Lalibela is one of Ethiopia’s holiest cities, second only to Axum, and a center of pilgrimage. Unlike Axum, the population of Lalibela is almost completely Ethiopian Orthodox Christian.

Ethiopia was one of the earliest nations to adopt Christianity in the first half of the 4th century, and its historical roots date to the time of the Apostles. The churches themselves date from the 7th to 13th centuries, and are traditionally dated to the reign of the Zagwe king Gebre Mesqel Lalibela (r. ca. 1181–1221).

There are two main groups of churches – to the north of the river Jordan: Biete Medhani Alem  (House of the Saviour of the World), Biete  Mariam (House of Mary), Biete  Maskal (House of the Cross), Biete Denagel (House of Virgins), Biete Golgotha Mikael (House of Golgotha Mikael); and to the south of the river, Biete Amanuel (House of Emmanuel), Biete Qeddus Mercoreus (House of St. Mercoreos), Biete Abba Libanos (House of Abbot Libanos), Biete Gabriel Raphael (House of Gabriel Raphael), and Biete Lehem (House of Holy Bread). The eleventh church, Biete Ghiorgis (House of St. George), is isolated from the others, but connected by a system of trenches.

The churches were not constructed in a traditional way but rather were hewn from the living rock of monolithic blocks. These blocks were further chiseled out, forming doors, windows, columns, various floors, roofs etc. This gigantic work was further completed with an extensive system of drainage ditches, trenches and ceremonial passages, some with openings to hermit caves and catacombs.